In The News

Is Your Dog’s Diet Heartbreaking? 


If you feed your pet a grain-free diet, home-cooked meals or food with exotic and atypical ingredients, you may want to reconsider. Veterinary cardiologists, nutritionists and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are currently investigating a possible link between those types of diets and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs. DCM can result in abnormal heart rhythms, congestive heart failure and even sudden death.

Hill’s Pet Nutrition Voluntarily Recalls Select Canned Dog Food for Excessive Vitamin D

 

Update January 31, 6:30 pm CST:

Hill’s Pet Nutrition is voluntarily recalling select canned dog food products due to potentially elevated levels of vitamin D. While vitamin D is an essential nutrient for dogs, ingestion of elevated levels can lead to potential health issues depending on the level of vitamin D and the length of exposure, and dogs may exhibit symptoms such as vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst, increased urination, excessive drooling, and weight loss. Vitamin D, when consumed at very high levels, can lead to serious health issues in dogs including renal dysfunction. Pet parents with dogs who have consumed any of the products listed and are exhibiting any of these signs should contact their veterinarian. In most cases, complete recovery is expected after discontinuation of feeding.

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FDA Alerts – Milo’s Kitchen Pet Treats

FDA Alerts Pet Owners about the Presence of Thyroid Hormones in Certain Milo’s Kitchen Pet Treats

The J.M. Smucker Company has initiated a recall of certain Milo’s Kitchen dog treats due to the presence of thyroid hormones. The FDA is issuing this notice in order to make pet owners aware of the firm’s action.

The FDA has received reports of four dogs experiencing symptoms, including excessive thirst, excessive urination, increased appetite, and restlessness. Three of the dogs were tested and had increased concentrations of thyroid hormone in their blood, also known as hyperthyroidism. The fourth dog was not tested but was suspected to also be suffering from hyperthyroidism. After the pets’ veterinarians ruled out thyroid cancer as the cause, the FDA determined the hyperthyroidism was connected to an external source, such as a food. The FDA’s Vet-LIRN interviewed the dogs’ owners and confirmed that all of the dogs ate at least one of the recalled pet treat products from Milo’s Kitchen. Once the Milo’s Kitchen treats were removed from the dogs’ diets, the hyperthyroidism symptoms resolved.

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FDA Warning – Darwin’s Raw Pet Food

FDA issues another warning about Tukwila-based Darwin’s raw pet food

The agency says there have been five recalls of and multiple complaints about Darwin’s, manufactured from Oct. 17, 2016, to March 26, concerning issues about shiga toxin-producing E. coli O128, salmonella and/or listeria monocytogenes.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued another public-health warning about potential contamination found in Tukwila-based Darwin’s Natural Selections and Darwin’s ZooLogics pet foods.

On Monday, the agency said there have been five recalls of and multiple complaints about Darwin’s, manufactured by Arrow Reliance from Oct. 17, 2016, to March 26. In each case, the FDA said the company recalled the products after being alerted that shiga toxin-producing E. coli O128, salmonella and/or listeria monocytogenes were found in samples of the raw pet food.

Darwin’s has notified its customers directly of the recalls, the FDA said, but it has not issued any public notification announcing this or any of the previous recalls. The agency warned that it has a zero-tolerance policy for harmful bacteria in pet food, “meaning the agency will take action, as appropriate.”

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Two Types of Rad Cat Raw Pet Food Recalled for Possible Listeria Monocytogenes Contamination

Radagast Pet Food of Portland, Oregon is recalling one lot of their Free-Range Chicken and one lot of Free-Range Turkey raw pet food because they may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes bacteria. No pet or human illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem. The FDA and the Ohio Department of Agriculture found two samples that tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes. bacteria.

The lot of Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Chicken has lot number 62762, a best by date of 10/19/18, and was shipped to distributors in May 2017 in California, Minnesota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. The product has UPC codes depending on the package size.

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Three more dog foods, treats recalled over possible contamination

 

Three dog food and treat products were recalled over the weekend by manufacturers because of possible listeria or salmonella contamination. This comes on the heels of a series of massive pet-food recalls this month over possible salmonella, listeria and pentobarbital contamination.

Northwest Naturals, of Portland, is recalling its 5-pound frozen Chicken and Salmon pet food chubs because it may be contaminated with listeria monocytogenes. Product is packaged in 5-pound frozen chubs labeled Chicken and Salmon Dog Food with a UPC code of 0 87316 38440 6 and a product best buy date code of 15 082218. The company says the product was one isolated batch of 94 cases distributed in California, Washington, Texas, Michigan, Georgia, and Rhode Island and sold thru specialty pet-retail stores.

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4 pet food companies recall products over salmonella concerns

(CBS) – Four companies are recalling pet food possibly contaminated with salmonella after six animals died or were sickened, and two children became ill, according to federal food safety officials.

The cases involving half a dozen pets, including a kitten, are tied to Darwin’s Natural and ZooLogics pet foods, made by Arrow Reliance of Tukwila, Wash., according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“The FDA has investigated six complaints of illness and death in animals that have eaten the recalled products,” the agency said Wednesday.

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Dog food brands recalled over possible euthanasia drug

(CNN)A drug used to euthanize animals has been found in canned dog food, prompting a recall. Low levels of the drug pentobarbital were detected in cans of Gravy Train dog food produced by the J.M. Smucker Company, the FDA said in a statement Friday.

Pentobarbital is most commonly used as a sedative, anesthetic or to euthanize animals, it said.

“Pets that eat pet food containing pentobarbital can experience drowsiness, dizziness, excitement, loss of balance, nausea, nystagmus (eyes moving back and forth in a jerky manner) and inability to stand. Consuming high levels of pentobarbital can cause coma and death,” it said.

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Two Pet Food Products Recalled for Possible Salmonella Contamination

Two pet food products have been recalled for possible Salmonella contamination. One of the recalled products has no illnesses linked to it; the other has had two reported illnesses.

The first recall is for Smokehouse Pet Products, recalling limited lots of “Beefy Munchies.” The product is sold in 4 ounce bags with UPC number 78565857957 and lot number 449294 and with a best used by date of 10/25/19 stamped on the back. They were sold in Washington, Michigan, North Carolina and Colorado through distributors selling to various retailers. Routine sampling by the Colorado Department of Agriculture revealed the presence of the pathogenic bacteria in two packages of the product. No illnesses have been reported to date with this recall.

The second recall is for Raws for Paws Ground Turkey Pet Food. The Minnesota company is recalling about 4,00o pounds of 1 pound and 5 pound chubs. The product was distributed through Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa directly to consumers and through online mail order.

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FDA Cracks Down

The Food and Drug Administration ordered 14 companies to stop making fraudulent claims about cancer cures and warned consumers that such products are untested and possibly dangerous. (Andrew Harnik/AP)

Asparagus extract. Exotic teas. Topical creams for your pet — and you. These and dozens of other products are being touted falsely as having “anti-cancer” properties, according to federal regulators who are trying to stop the practice.

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