Camping and Hiking

 

 
Hiking or camping with your dog is a great treat for you and your pooch, as you both get to bask in nature’s majesty while enjoying fresh air and exercise. However, there are things pet owners need to be aware of to keep their best friend happy and healthy, specifically toxic plants and animals that your dog may find appealing. Below are just a few of the more common ones you may encounter.


death camas

Death Camas

This plant’s flowers grow in clusters that look like onion bulbs, and they bloom between April and July in hillsides, dry meadows, forests and sagebrush slopes. Easily confused with wild onion or the common camas, this entire plant is poisonous to both you and your dog if consumed.

 

Effects: Weakness, salivation, paralysis, respiratory difficulties, nausea, convulsions, coma and even death.

 


death-cap-mushroom

Death Cap Mushroom

This is one of the most poisonous mushrooms in the northern hemisphere, causing the majority of human poisonings in North America.   Usually appears in summer and autumn by areas with oak, spruce and chestnut trees.

 

Effects: Abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, gastrointestinal bleeding, kidney failure, coma, and death.

 


Fish (Salmon) Poisoning

Salmon poisoning disease (fish disease) is a potentially fatal condition seen in dogs who have ingested certain types of raw fish found in the Pacific Northwest from San Francisco to the coast of Alaska. It is most prevalent from northern California to the Puget Sound. It is also seen inland along the rivers of fish migration.

 

Effects: Most commonly will see mild fevers, vomiting and/or diarrhea but not always, lethargy, inappetence, mild lymph node enlargements. Can be life-threatening if dehydration proceeds to shock.

 


rough-skinned-newt

Rough-Skinned Newt

Widely distributed throughout the Pacific NW, the  Rough-skinned newts have a powerful neurological poison in their skin and eggs to protect them from predators. It is distinctive with rough skin and a bright orange to yellow belly

 

Effects: Numbness, vomiting, death if eaten. Irritation to skin or eyes if handled.


water-hemlockWater Hemlock

This wetland plant can be commonly found growing in pastures or near the edge of the water and is common along the Deschutes River and other Oregon streams. Often confused with wild celery or fennel, It is similar in appearance to the Poison Hemlock and is highly toxic and should be avoided.

Effects: Teeth grinding, muscle spasms, respiratory failure, delirium, and death.

For any questions on toxic plants and how to keep your pet safe while camping or hiking, contact us at (503) 636-2102.